Moths and Perhaps Other Animals Rely on Precise Timing of Neural Spikes

Related Images

News Image Block

Research on the hummingbird-sized hawk moth (Manduca sexta) shows that millisecond changes in timing of its action potential spikes conveys the majority of information the moth uses to coordinate the muscles in its wings. (Credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Tech)

A hawk moth (Manduca sexta) flaps its wings as tiny wires transmit the signals produced by its muscles to a computer for analysis. The research showed that millisecond changes in timing of the action potential spikes conveys the majority of information the moth uses to coordinate the muscles in its wings. (Credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Tech)

Researchers Joy Putney, Simon Sponberg, and Rachel Conn discuss analysis of signals from a hawk moth (Manduca sexta). The research showed that millisecond changes in timing of the action potential spikes conveys the majority of information the moth uses to coordinate the muscles in its wings. (Credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Tech)

Georgia Tech researcher Simon Sponberg holds a hawkmoth (Manduca sexta). Research on this hummingbird-sized insect shows that millisecond changes in timing of its action potential spikes conveys the majority of information the moth uses to coordinate the muscles in its wings. (Credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Tech)