Georgia Tech School of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Vinayak Agarwal


 

Research Interests:

A majority of antibiotics and drugs that we use in the clinic are derived or inspired from small organic molecules called Natural Products that are produced by living organisms such as bacteria and plants. Natural Products are at the forefront of fighting the global epidemic of antibiotic resistant pathogens, and keeping the inventory of clinically applicable pharmaceuticals stocked up. Some Natural Products are also potent human toxins and pollutants, and we need to understand how these toxins are produced to minimize our and the environmental exposure to them.

We as biochemists ask some simple questions- how and why are Natural Products produced in Nature, what we can learn from Natural Product biosynthetic processes, and how we can exploit Nature's synthetic capabilities for interesting applications?

Broadly, we are interested in questions involving (meta)genomics, biochemistry, structural and mechanistic enzymology, mass spectrometry, analytical chemistry, and how natural product chemistry dictates biology.

Wendy Kelly


 

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Biosynthesis of polyketide and nonribosomal peptide antibiotics

Raquel Lieberman


 

Research Keywords:

structural biology, protein misfolding, amyloid, glaucoma, crystallography, molecular biophysics

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The Lieberman research group focuses on biophysical and structural characterization of proteins involved in misfolding disorders. One major research project in the lab has been investigations of the glaucoma-associated myocilin protein. The lab has made major strides toward detailed molecular understanding of myocilin structure, function, and disease pathogenesis. Our research has clearly demonstrated similarities between myocilin glaucoma and other protein misfolding disorders, particularly amyloid diseases. The work has led to new efforts aimed at ameliorating the misfolding phenotype using chemical biology approaches. Our second project involves the study of membrane-spanning proteolytic enzymes, which have been implicated disorders such as Alzheimer disease. Our group is tackling questions surrounding discrimination among and presentation of transmembrane substrates as well as the enzymatic details of peptide hydrolysis. In addition to the biochemical characterization of intramembrane aspartyl proteases, our group is developing new crystallographic tools to improve the likelihood of determining structures of similarly challenging membrane proteins more generally. 

Robert Dickson


 

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Single Molecule Biophysics, Optical Properties of Individual Nanoparticles, Single Molecule Electroluminescence

Yomi Oyelere


 

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Small Molecule Interaction with Nucleic Acids and Associated Proteins

Loren Williams


 

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Loren Williams' research is focused on fundamental aspects of nucleic acid structure and chemistry.

Donald Doyle


 

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Engineering Nuclear Hormone Receptors Nuclear hormone receptors control the expression of genes in response to small molecule hormones

Ronghu Wu


 

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Our research focuses on LC-MS based proteomics and its biomedical applications. Novel MS based methods are being developed to characterize proteins, especially protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). MS-based large-scale analysis can systematically identify and quantify proteins and their PTMs for the different states of cells or tissues, such as cancerous samples. This may provide a better understanding of the function of proteins, the role that proteins play in physiological and pathological processes, cell signaling, cell metabolism, and the relationship between proteins and cancer.

Nicholas Hud


 

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Intercalation-mediated Nucleic Acid Assembly, The Molecular Midwife & the Origin of Life, Nucleic Acid-Cation Interactions, Understanding DNA & RNA Condensation

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