Thwarting Metastasis by Breaking Cancer’s Legs with Gold Rods

Related Images

News Image Block

Artist rendering of cancer cells wandering. Credit: Purchased from iStock to illustrate this story. Rights not transferable. 

A dying cancer cell with filopodia stretched out to its right. The protrusions help cancer migrate. Stock NIH NCMIR image. The image does not display a cell treated in the Georgia Tech study. Credit: NIH-funded image of HeLa cell / National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research / Thomas Deerinck / Mark Ellisman. Use may require permission.

Georgia Tech's Regents Professor Mostafa El-Sayed (front) is one of the most highly decorated and cited living chemists. With his team for this research from left to right: Yue Wu, Professor Ronghu Wu, and Yan Tang. Credit: Georgia Tech / Christopher Moore

From left to right: Untreated lab culture cancer cell, lab culture cancer cell with gold nanorods attached, lab culture cancer cell after addition of gentle NIR laser light. Credit: Georgia Tech / El-Sayed group

Gold nanorods. Credit: Georgia Tech / El-Sayed group 

Georgia Tech's Regents Professor Mostafa El-Sayed (front) is one of the most highly decorated and cited living chemists. With his team for this research from left to right: Yue Wu, Professor Ronghu Wu, and Yan Tang. Credit: Georgia Tech / Christopher Moore