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Raquel Lieberman, associate professor at the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, is having the Best. Winter. Ever.

CauteryGuard among six teams vying for $20,000 top prize

Petit Institute postdoc working to find a cure for type 1 diabetes

Trio of Petit Institute labs link tendon overuse injury to degenerative changes in shoulder cartilage

Researchers have developed a new technique for rapidly screening the ability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to specific organs of the body.

Founder and Director of the Center for Innovative Cardiovascular Technologies

The actions of bacteria locked in battle are nearly as calculable as a chemical reaction.

2017 class of Petit Undergraduate Research Scholars most diverse in program history

A frog's saliva changes three times in milliseconds as it snares food with its tongue.

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In the News

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Bees perform a crucial function for nature by pollinating crops. Now, researches out of Georgia Tech have explored how they keep themselves clean while dealing with that messy pollen.
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Georgia Tech students create Wobble device to help track recovery from head injuries
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New research from Georgia Tech grad student in physics focuses on toroidal droplets and has implications for the life sciences.
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Petit Institute researchers unravel the mystery of a frog's super-soft, super-sticky tongue
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In the New York Times: Who knew that a frog playing an electronic game could lead to a groundbreaking discovery?
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The super sticky frog tongue grabs wet, hairy, slippery surfaces better than engineered adhesives.
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Georgia Tech doctoral student Alexis Noel discovers frog tongues are among the softest biological substances ever measured.
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Implant developed at Georgia Tech zaps vagus nerve to treat inflammation.

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