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Proteins are tough to make outside a living cell, so how did their components evolve on pre-life Earth? Perhaps easier than thought.

Inducted into the Biomedical Engineering Society’s 2017 Class of BMES Fellows

Advancing research in medical robotics to improve patient quality of life

Evolution has improved upon the genetic foundations of human health ... but could that have changed?

Georgia Tech interdisciplinary graduate program in QBioS welcomes second cohort

Petit Institute researchers at Georgia Tech use novel approach to predict complication risk in Crohn’s disease study

Petit Institute researcher contributing to ambitious BRAIN Initiative

The aim of targeted gene-based cancer therapies could be skewed from the start more often than not, a new study shows.

U.S. Military Academy cadets gain biomedical research experience in Manu Platt’s lab

Researchers use DNA "barcodes" to develop new technique for rapidly screening nanoparticles

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In the News

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Bees perform a crucial function for nature by pollinating crops. Now, researches out of Georgia Tech have explored how they keep themselves clean while dealing with that messy pollen.
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Georgia Tech students create Wobble device to help track recovery from head injuries
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New research from Georgia Tech grad student in physics focuses on toroidal droplets and has implications for the life sciences.
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Petit Institute researchers unravel the mystery of a frog's super-soft, super-sticky tongue
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In the New York Times: Who knew that a frog playing an electronic game could lead to a groundbreaking discovery?
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The super sticky frog tongue grabs wet, hairy, slippery surfaces better than engineered adhesives.
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Georgia Tech doctoral student Alexis Noel discovers frog tongues are among the softest biological substances ever measured.
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Implant developed at Georgia Tech zaps vagus nerve to treat inflammation.
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National Cell Manufacturing Consortium led by Georgia Tech recognized by Georgia Bio

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