Synthetic Hydrogels Deliver Cells to Repair Intestinal Injuries

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Georgia Tech Graduate Research Assistant Ricardo Cruz-Acuña holds multiwell plates containing hydrogel matrix materials and human intestinal organoids (HIOs). The research may lead to a new technique for treating injuries caused by gastrointestinal diseases. (Credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Tech)

Human intestinal organoids (HIOs) generated in the hydrogel matrix differentiate into mature intestinal tissue and present specialized human intestinal cell types, such as enteroendocrine cells (CHGA; red), after transplantation into an animal. (Credit: Miguel Quirós, University of Michigan)

Georgia Tech Graduate Research Assistant Ricardo Cruz-Acuña examines differentiating human intestinal organoids (HIOs) under a microscope. The research may lead to a new technique for treating injuries caused by gastrointestinal diseases. (Credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Tech)

Georgia Tech Graduate Research Assistant Ricardo Cruz-Acuña prepares hydrogel matrix materials containing human intestinal organoids (HIOs). The research may lead to a new technique for treating injuries caused by gastrointestinal diseases. (Credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Tech)