Snaring Bacteria in DNA-based Nets the Way White Blood Cells Do

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Nature inspired this synthetic microweb that nabs bacteria and allows antibiotics to more effectively kill them. White blood cells shoot so-called NETs like Spiderman at bacteria. NETs contain hundreds of ingredients, the main one being DNA, but researchers engineered their microweb with just DNA and one other ingredient. Credit: Georgia Tech / Ella Maru Studio (work for hire)

Nature inspired this synthetic microweb that nabs bacteria and allows antibiotics to more effectively kill them. White blood cells shoot so-called NETs like Spiderman at bacteria. NETs contain hundreds of ingredients, the main one being DNA, but researchers engineered their microweb with just DNA and one other ingredient. Credit: Georgia Tech / Ella Maru Studio (work for hire)

This is how the researchers got the idea to make their microwebs to snare bacteria the way white blood cells use so-called NETs to do it in our bodies. Credit: Georgia Tech / University of Michigan

Shuichi Takayama is a professor in the Wallace E. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University. Credit: Georgia Tech / Rob Felt