Red Glow Helps Identify Nanoparticles for Delivering RNA Therapies

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James Dahlman, an assistant professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University, holds a microfluidic chip used to fabricate nanoparticles that could be used to deliver therapeutic genes. (Credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Tech)

Cells that are normally bright green turn bright red after lipid nanoparticles have delivered an mRNA cargo encoding Cre. Cells that are red contain the mRNA, while green cells do not. (Credit: Daryll Vanover, Georgia Tech)

James Dahlman, an assistant professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University, is shown in his laboratory. (Credit: Christopher Moore, Georgia Tech)