Microneedle Patch for Flu Vaccination Successful in First Human Clinical Trial

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This close-up image shows the microneedle vaccine patch, which contains tiny needles that dissolve into the skin, carrying vaccine. A majority of study participants said they would prefer to receive the influenza vaccine using patches rather than traditional hypodermic needles.

This photograph shows how the microneedle vaccine patch was applied to study participants. To study the possibility that patches could be self-administered, some participants applied the patches to themselves. (Credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Tech)

Nadine Rouphael, M.D., associate professor of medicine (infectious diseases) at Emory University School of Medicine (standing) and study participant Daisy Bourassa, demonstrate how the microneedle vaccine patch was applied. (Credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Tech)

Mark Prausnitz, Ph.D., Georgia Tech Regents professor in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, holds a microneedle vaccine patch containing needles that dissolve into the skin. (Credit: Christopher Moore, Georgia Tech)

Mark Prausnitz, Ph.D., Georgia Tech Regents professor in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, holds a microneedle vaccine patch containing needles that dissolve into the skin. (Credit: Christopher Moore, Georgia Tech)

Mark Prausnitz, PhD, Georgia Tech Regents professor in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, is shown in the laboratory where the microneedle vaccine patch was developed. (Credit: Christopher Moore, Georgia Tech)

This close-up image shows a microneedle array containing influenza vaccine. When pressed into the skin, the tiny needles dissolve, carrying vaccine into the skin. A majority of study participants said they would prefer to receive the influenza vaccine using patches rather than traditional hypodermic needles.

Researchers demonstrate the patch and discuss its applications