Insights on Sex and Death from a Mutant Roundworm

Related Images

News Image Block

Patrick McGrath holds up dishes with two lab strains of the C. elegans roundworm. Strain LSJ2 (dish on right) dramatically changed its survival strategy to live longer and have fewer offspring due to a tiny mutation on its NURF-1 gene. Researchers at Georgia Tech confirmed the effects of the mutation by duplicating it in lab strain N2 (dish on left) via an injection with CRISPR Cas9.

 

CRISPR Cas9 DNA is injected into a lab strain of C. elegans roundworm to confirm the sweeping effects on survival strategy from a tiny mutation.

Researchers Patrick McGrath and Wen Xu at a station used to inject a C. elegans lab strain with CRISPR Cas9 DNA to confirm the effects of a tiny mutation that triggered an overhaul of survival behaviors.

Georgia Tech researcher Patrick McGrath holds up a dish containing microscopic C. elegans roundworms. In a novel discovery, McGrath linked vast life history trade-offs to a single, tiny mutation. On the screen, the magnification of a C. elegans being injected with CRISPR Cas9 to confirm the mutation's effects.

Researcher Wen Xu uses a needle with a microscopic point to inject a C. elegans roundworm with CRISPR DNA. The gene editor helped confirm the sweeping effects of a tiny mutation Georgia Tech scientists have discovered.

C. elegans lab strains N2 and NURF-1 mutants under the microscope.

In a separate experiment, Patrick McGrath's team at Georgia Tech is testing to see if C. elegans roundworms will mutate into the ability to swim by letting them live in a verticle slide filled with fluid. The worms would have to adapt to swimming to be able to move around the slide.

In a separate experiment, Patrick McGrath's team at Georgia Tech is testing to see if C. elegans roundworms will mutate into the ability to swim by letting them live in a vertical slide filled with fluid. The worms would have to adapt to swimming to be able to move around the slide.