3D-Printed Tracheal Splints Used in Groundbreaking Pediatric Surgery

Related Images

News Image Block

3D printed tracheal splints are shown around a model of a patient’s trachea. The splints are designed to be absorbed into the body, allowing for expansion of the trachea and bronchus. (Credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Tech)

Research Scientist Sarah Jo Crotts and Biomedical Engineering Professor Scott Hollister are shown at the Global Center for Medical Innovation (GCMI). Hollister holds the Patsy and Alan Dorris Endowed Chair in Pediatric Technology, a joint initiative supported by Georgia Tech and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. (Credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Tech)

3D printed tracheal splints are shown around a model of a patient’s trachea. The splints are designed to be absorbed into the body, allowing for expansion of the trachea and bronchus. (Credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Tech)

With assistance from Georgia Tech, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta has performed Georgia’s first-ever procedure to place 3D-printed tracheal splints in a pediatric patient. The splints were designed by Scott Hollister, who holds the Patsy and Alan Dorris Endowed Chair in Pediatric Technology, a joint initiative supported by Georgia Tech and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta. (Credit: Children's Healthcare of Atlanta)

See how biomedical engineers at the Georgia Institute of Technology helped create 3D-printed tracheal splints used by surgeons at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta to keep a child’s airway from collapsing. In 2015, Georgia Tech and Children’s formed The Children's Healthcare of Atlanta Pediatric Technology Center on Georgia Tech's campus to further advance pediatric research such as this. (Credit: Georgia Tech)